If you live in America, should you speak English?


Why are people so scared of different languages? Not so long ago I saw a verbal war on an online garage sale blog because two people had a conversation in Spanish. It went back and forth and of course, just like most things that deal with culture, it got nasty. 

I was born in El Paso, a border town. I spent half of my life there. I am ashamed to say my Spanish is very remedial. When you grow up in a border town, hearing Spanish is a daily event. El Paso was extra special because it also has a military base, Ft. Hood, within its county. I was exposed to so many different cultures and languages. Speaking a different language was an everyday occurrence.

© 2014, MaLu Bradford Beyonce  During the Super Bowl there was a lot of controversy about the song, “America the Beautiful,” being sung in several languages other than English. I didn’t comment on this controversy because I still to this day haven’t seen the commercial. I can’t have an unbiased opinion because I heard of the controversy before I saw the commercial. 

I am on the fence about whether or not the United States of America should have some sort of standardized language. My brother’s first language is Spanish. I’m jealous of him. He speaks both English and Spanish. However, when he was about 8 or 9, I had to literally force him to speak English. Now, he thanks me for pushing him to speak English. I would tell him, he is in America and you need to speak English.

Of course I have nothing against Spanish speakers. My grandma’s first language was Spanish. It just seemed unnatural to live in Texas and not speak English at the time. I have to fight my thoughts of people who are so against Spanish speakers as being racist. They could have different valid reasons, that have nothing to do with race. The main reason I think you should do your best to speak and read English is because of feasibility. It cost so much more to print everything twice in two languages. To me, it just make economical sense. Now to my Spanish speakers, I am not against you. I am myself part Mexican and proud of it. I know there are some Spanish speakers that resist speaking English. Some of my own family belongs to this group. My maternal grandmother didn’t speak English at all. I have cousins that I am close to that do not speak English; however, they live in Juarez, Mexico. They are perfectly happy coming over to El Paso and can manage quite well without speaking English. A couple of them even work in El Paso but yet have not mastered the English language. I constantly debate with them, sometimes in Spanish, as to why it is important to not only know English but to speak English. 

From multiple debates with friends and family, here are the top reasons I found as to why native Spanish speakers, choose to not speak English: 1. They simply don’t know it and don’t think they can learn it, 2. They are uncomfortable to the point of embarrassment when they try to speak English, 3. It’s a habit; they are so use to speaking Spanish, it is just natural to do so. 4. They don’t want to forget their culture and their language is one of the best ways to hold on to it. 5. It makes them feel good to speak Spanish even when they know English because they know a lot of people only speak one language. Yes, it makes them feel superior to know two languages. Let’s talk about point number five. I know alot of people don’t like it when people speak a different language in front of them because sometimes we immediately think they are doing it to talk about us or to deceive us in some way. I can understand that because it does happen. However, I have this motto. If I don’t say something to your face it is because I respect you. For example, if I tell my husband, man I don’t like her haircut but to your face tell you I think it is nice, it is out of respect. There are a lot of things we all say but would never say it to their face or want them to know we said it.

Same goes when something is said in a different language. I think there are more pressing matters in this country to have debates about that have more weight than different languages being used in America. I find it kind of ironic that a Super Bowl commercial sparked so much controversy. I wish I spoke Spanish better. I don’t know why my grandma didn’t teach us better. She was very fluent in both English and Spanish. As her Alzheimer’s got worse, she forgot how to speak English. I think that says a lot. When you grow up speaking Spanish or whatever is your first language, that is what you hold on to no matter where you are living. It is who you are and why would anyone want to deny that.

© 2014, MaLu Bradford Beyonce



Dear friend of the Blog,

This is just a little reminder about an informal get-together on Sun 12th over Skype, details anounced on the previous post. This will be in English, little after Sunday dinner.

Look forward to sharing some thoughts with some of you. 




Dear friend of the Blog,

This is just a little reminder about an informal get-together today over Skype, details anounced on the previous post. Today this will be in Spanish, just after breakfast of most of you readers, and tomorrow in English, little after Sunday dinner.

Look forward to sharing some thoughts with some of you. ‘Tis an important day ’cause my mother departed yesterday towards the House of the Father. She gave me my life. Now she has found her Life for ever more.

Have an ace of a day!



My dear friend, 

why not join me in an informal Get-together on Skype for about 30 to 40 minutes this Saturday 11/JAN in Spanish at 4 PM (GMT+1 – Madrid Time/ 10 AM NYT – New York Time) and Sunday 12/JAN in English at 10 AM (GMT+1 – Madrid Time/ 01 PM MSK – Moscow Standard Time) ?

You may as well send me an email to jordipicazosalomo@gmail.com and book (optional – Skype takes only 6/7 people in optimum conditions) to join me for a Get-together. Minimum level required B1 European Framework for Languages or Intermediate Level. 

 You just go and appear on Skype and contact me at “jordi.picazo“. We can create an informal group to share ideas and experiences.

 This is the best way to learn a language: speak it. Once you have studied it, it is time to just speak it and give it a boost.

 I’d love to get to know some of you that read the Blog from all over the world, regardless of whether your native language is the target language in the get-together or you want to practice it. We may as well start talking about the posts you most liked in here.


Deal? Go for it. I’ll be here waiting for you to join.

 Greetings from the Cyberspace.



INDIA – Those who speak English fluently earn up to 34% more than others

Those who speak English fluently earn up to 34% more than others

According to the report, only 20% of Indian population can speak in English, and only 4% would be considered fluent, in the language.
NEW DELHI: Those who speak English fluently earn up to 34% more than those who don’t speak the language, a recent report has found, confirming the link between an education in English and the scope of employment opportunities

But given the constraints of cost and access, the number of those studying in English medium is yet to pick up. Less than 25% of students of higher education are studying in English medium in the north central region of India, including Bihar and UP, compared to around 75% in south India.

Higher education in Indian languages costs between Rs 1,200 and Rs 3, 000 a year, while English medium costs 6-8 times more, between Rs 8,000 and 15,000 a year. But the investment is seen as worthwhile since education in English is likely to to yield higher wages, says the report authored by Dr Abusaleh Shariff of the Centre for Research and Debates in Development Policy, New Delhi and Amit Sharma, research analyst with the National Council for Applied Economic Research.

“Men who speak English fluently earn wages about 34% higher and men who speak a little English earn wages about 13% higher than those who don’t speak any English,” the report said.

According to the report, only 20% of the Indian population can speak in English, and only 4% would be considered fluent. Where one lives is a key determinant in accessing English medium education, it found.

Politicians who don’t like English are captains of a sinking ship. Higher education in English helps us get better integrated into the globalized organized sector and labour market. Those without access to higher education in English are being left out,” Dr Shariff told TOI.