25% de descuento en el precio de los cursos de inglés hasta diciembre: Londres y Dublín.

English Tutors byJordiPicazo te ofrece un 25% de descuento en los precios de tu curso en módulos semanales de inglés en Londres, 10% en Dublín.Classroom

Cursos para profesionales y adultos jóvenes. Residencia disponible en casa del profesor, en casa de una familia, en piso compartido o residencia e estudiantes.

House-Share-2 Host-Family-3

  Inglés General, Business o para Exámenes oficiales, más Conversación.

Our partner English Schools in  London


Our Partner School is located in central London, Zone 1 in beautiful Bloomsbury Square. Location is important for most students and our school is located, just 1 minute walk from Holborn Metro/Tube Station or 7 minutes’ walk from Russell Square or Tottenham Court Road Metro Stations – Bloomsbury Square is a perfect place to have lunch and relax after class and creates a great view from all of the classrooms.

The School is based in a lovely Georgian building with 14 large, bright and modern classes. The building, includes fully-equipped high-spec teaching rooms, a computer room, a reception area and a student-room.



London is one of the most vibrant, cosmopolitan cities in the world. Whatever you are interested in, whether it is culture, fashion, sports, nightlife or being in one of the top 3 financial capitals in the world with a view to working after your studies, London is the place to be.



Read more about our English Tutors byJordiPicazo

We aim to be the best English school in both the UK and Ireland and soon further afield! Key to this is having some of the most talented and happy teachers you will find in any English school and we take great care to make sure that is always the case. On top of this we have great support staff and this means we can offer you a service second to none in all aspects of your stay with us.



Learning a language is not just about studying inthe classroom however and that is why we make enormous efforts to give you as many possibilities to practice English outside of classes and meet native speakers with a social programme that is a little different. If you want to visit London and learn English then Delfin English School is the place to be!



Contact Us

If you would like more information about learning English in London and attending our School.

Dublin City

Dublin City


English Tutors byJordiPicazo: 7-razones-7 para hacer inglés con English Tutors por Skype

7-razones-7 para hacer inglés con English Tutors   por Skype:

1. optimización del tiempo (30 minutos, mínimo dos veces por semana),
2. no te desplazas para ello, y puedes cambiar día y hora avisando incluso el mismo día, 
3. nunca pierdes una sesión, la cambias de día, 
4. en una academia dejas de ir un 20% del tiempo, 20% del coste tirado a la papelera, 
5. cuando estás de viaje, te conectas con la tablet o teléfono móvil por Skype, o te llamo yo sin coste, 
6. certificación documental de horas tomadas y rendimiento. 
7. Profesor con 25+ años de experiencia, en Londres y España. 
http://www.englishtutors.es @ENGLISHTUTORSes

Casa Coll i Regàs
Richard Vaughan with Jordi Picazo, EnglishTutors byJordiPicazo

Join me in a get-together tomorrow Sun 22 June, 3 PM GMT for Spanish, and 3:45 PM GMT in English

Dear Blog friend,

Tomorrow Sunday 22 June some of us will get together on Skype to chat a bit about general things or maybe even professional matters…

Feel free you too, to join in at the announced times, for one of the languages or for both.

We may then even establish naturally some other groups and decide to meet at other times.

Just add me to your Skype account, or download Skype for free and open an account for yourself. My ID on Skype is jordi.picazo, I appear as Jordi Picazo, language coach.

See you tomorrow on air.





Please, feel free to join me in a chat on Skype. My Skype ID is jordi.picazo, u can find me there as Language Coach… 



Podemos practicar el inglés o el español, o ambos. Y hablar de temas de interés mundial.

Los sábados y domingos podemos encontrarnos en Skype.

We can have a get-together for about fourty minutes and have fun practicing English or Spanish with me.

If you live in America, should you speak English?


Why are people so scared of different languages? Not so long ago I saw a verbal war on an online garage sale blog because two people had a conversation in Spanish. It went back and forth and of course, just like most things that deal with culture, it got nasty. 

I was born in El Paso, a border town. I spent half of my life there. I am ashamed to say my Spanish is very remedial. When you grow up in a border town, hearing Spanish is a daily event. El Paso was extra special because it also has a military base, Ft. Hood, within its county. I was exposed to so many different cultures and languages. Speaking a different language was an everyday occurrence.

© 2014, MaLu Bradford Beyonce  During the Super Bowl there was a lot of controversy about the song, “America the Beautiful,” being sung in several languages other than English. I didn’t comment on this controversy because I still to this day haven’t seen the commercial. I can’t have an unbiased opinion because I heard of the controversy before I saw the commercial. 

I am on the fence about whether or not the United States of America should have some sort of standardized language. My brother’s first language is Spanish. I’m jealous of him. He speaks both English and Spanish. However, when he was about 8 or 9, I had to literally force him to speak English. Now, he thanks me for pushing him to speak English. I would tell him, he is in America and you need to speak English.

Of course I have nothing against Spanish speakers. My grandma’s first language was Spanish. It just seemed unnatural to live in Texas and not speak English at the time. I have to fight my thoughts of people who are so against Spanish speakers as being racist. They could have different valid reasons, that have nothing to do with race. The main reason I think you should do your best to speak and read English is because of feasibility. It cost so much more to print everything twice in two languages. To me, it just make economical sense. Now to my Spanish speakers, I am not against you. I am myself part Mexican and proud of it. I know there are some Spanish speakers that resist speaking English. Some of my own family belongs to this group. My maternal grandmother didn’t speak English at all. I have cousins that I am close to that do not speak English; however, they live in Juarez, Mexico. They are perfectly happy coming over to El Paso and can manage quite well without speaking English. A couple of them even work in El Paso but yet have not mastered the English language. I constantly debate with them, sometimes in Spanish, as to why it is important to not only know English but to speak English. 

From multiple debates with friends and family, here are the top reasons I found as to why native Spanish speakers, choose to not speak English: 1. They simply don’t know it and don’t think they can learn it, 2. They are uncomfortable to the point of embarrassment when they try to speak English, 3. It’s a habit; they are so use to speaking Spanish, it is just natural to do so. 4. They don’t want to forget their culture and their language is one of the best ways to hold on to it. 5. It makes them feel good to speak Spanish even when they know English because they know a lot of people only speak one language. Yes, it makes them feel superior to know two languages. Let’s talk about point number five. I know alot of people don’t like it when people speak a different language in front of them because sometimes we immediately think they are doing it to talk about us or to deceive us in some way. I can understand that because it does happen. However, I have this motto. If I don’t say something to your face it is because I respect you. For example, if I tell my husband, man I don’t like her haircut but to your face tell you I think it is nice, it is out of respect. There are a lot of things we all say but would never say it to their face or want them to know we said it.

Same goes when something is said in a different language. I think there are more pressing matters in this country to have debates about that have more weight than different languages being used in America. I find it kind of ironic that a Super Bowl commercial sparked so much controversy. I wish I spoke Spanish better. I don’t know why my grandma didn’t teach us better. She was very fluent in both English and Spanish. As her Alzheimer’s got worse, she forgot how to speak English. I think that says a lot. When you grow up speaking Spanish or whatever is your first language, that is what you hold on to no matter where you are living. It is who you are and why would anyone want to deny that.

© 2014, MaLu Bradford Beyonce

MOOC will teach English

MOOC will teach English

FutureLearn and the British Council see India as a major market for MOOCs that teach English. Photo: Nic Walker

Tim Dodd

The UK-based FutureLearn will ­partner with the British Council, which already provides English language education, to pioneer MOOCs that teach the English language.

It is the first time that a major MOOC provider has announced plans to offer language courses. The two organisations said there would be a portfolio of English language courses ready in 2014 which would be focused on preparing ­students whose native language is not English for studying higher education courses taught in English.

The announcement was made in India, which FutureLearn and the ­British Council see as a major market for MOOCs that teach English. The two organisations said the MOOCs would also “provide a route for learners to take International English Language ­Testing System (IELTS) assessments at British Council testing centres”.

The British Council is a part-owner of the IELTS test, along with Australian company IDP Education, which ­operates a separate network of IELTS testing centres.

FutureLearn is owned by British education institution, The Open ­University, and has 29 partners which are mainly UK universities but also include the British Council and the ­British Museum.

Monash University is one of FutureLearn’s international ­partners.

The British Council is a non-profit organisation set up by Royal Charter to promote British culture and education internationally.

It is pitching English teaching MOOCs as a way of channelling ­international students to British ­universities.

“It is right that India should be one of the first places where we collectively launch the FutureLearn MOOC ­platform and courses,” said Martin Davidson, chief executive of the British Council. “FutureLearn will provide young Indians with another means of access to the UK’s world-class education ­institutions.”

In other news, the world’s leading MOOC provider, US-based Coursera, has raised $US20 million ($21.8 million) more than expected in its latest capital raising.

According to All Things D , Coursera’s $US43 million capital raising announced in July this year has expanded to $US63 million.

Three unnamed universities are responsible for most of the extra investment. Coursera has now totalled $US85 million in capital from investors.

Emancipating the English Language Learner

As you cooraptoriliate these words, make sure you flimp the scoglottora in proper schimliturn. You will only understand this column if hickitow glisps in baggaduanation. Use your joomering and begin.

Huh? _Look, everyone else reading this column has begun his or her work, why haven’t you? Seriously, use your joomering and get started. _What exactly do you want me to do? Hmm.  _Maybe you’re not ready for the level of comprehension this magazine requires of its readers. We might have a remedial magazine for you, perhaps something from Highlights for Children? _No, I really want to know. I can do whatever you ask, but I don’t know what it is. I’m actually a good reader and thinker, but I don’t use your words or have experience with your culture. Do not think of me as unintelligent!  _Maybe I could find something from the basic teacher texts for you if I only had the time. Just sit here a moment while I explain this information to the other readers and let them move ahead. I know this means you’ll be further behind than you already are, but it’s all I can offer right now.Wow. 

Just a couple of moments of walking in an English language learner’s shoes and a few things are abundantly clear:

  1. Well-intentioned yet uninformed teachers can offend English language learners (ELLs) if they are not careful.
  2. Some ELL students don’t receive appropriate instruction for their intellectual level.
  3. We feel a lot of anxiety when we don’t know the language or culture of the country in which we are living—so much so that some of us stop trying. It takes a tremendous amount of energy and patience every day to remain attentive and engaged when you’re learning a language, and some days ELL students are so emotionally drained they can’t muster either one.

We need to be mindful of the emotions at play when asking students to do all this thinking aloud in a language and culture foreign to their own. Students are stressed not only about learning a new academic concept, but also about having to adjust to different cultural expectations in which they may not succeed.Debra Coggins and her coauthors explain in English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom: “For students from cultures in which students are expected to wait to be asked before speaking, and where students are not expected to ask questions of elders, it is very important for the teacher to explicitly set the expectation for students to ask questions and express their opinions in the…classroom. Otherwise, classroom discourse becomes an exercise in trying to participate in a game where only others know the unwritten rules.”Simple StrategiesIf we embrace the promise of America from its earliest roots, we realize that with the noted exception of native peoples, we are a nation of immigrants. What can those of us not trained in working with English language learners do in our regular classrooms to help them succeed?Twenty minutes of empathetic reflection on the needs of ELL students yields some common sense responses that truly help them learn:

  1. Speak slowly and clearly.
  2. Repeat important words and information several times.
  3. Extend time for responding to prompts as necessary.
  4. Avoid using idioms and colloquialisms until students are more advanced with our culture; if we use them, we take the time to explain them.
  5. Gesture and point to what we are referring.
  6. Ask students to read text more than once.
  7. Label objects and concepts in the classroom frequently.
  8. Provide a lot of specific models, including hands-on experiences.
  9. Use visuals during instruction: pictures, illustrations, graphs, pictographs, as well as real objects.
  10. Frequently demonstrate what we mean, not just describe it.
  11. Make ELL students feel as though they belong and have a role to play in classroom learning. One way to do this is to find something in the student’s background that connects to the topic we’re studying.
  12. Use thinking aloud or self-talk to model the sequence of doing the task.
  13. Use cooperative learning groups; let ELL students work with English-proficient partners.
  14. Let students draw responses occasionally instead of writing them; use more than one format for assessing students if the general approach won’t allow ELL students to accurately portray what they know.
  15. Find ways to enable ELL students to demonstrate their intellectual skills and maintain dignity.
  16. Give students quick feedback on their word use: An ELL says in halting English, “This correct paper?” and we say in affirmation, “Yes, that is the correct paper. Thank you.”
  17. Spend time before lessons on important topics to build a personal background in English language learners so they have an equal chance to attach new learning to what’s already in their minds. This is good for all students, not just ELLs, of course. If we’re about to teach students about magnetic fields, for example, we can let them play with magnets, lightly pouring iron shavings near their poles to watch their pattern of dispersal or gathering.
  18. Stay focused on how ELL students are doing toward reaching their learning goals, not how they’re doing in relation to other students. This is huge. We remove all hope when we ceaselessly cajole ELL students into proficiency by comparing them to language-proficient students.
  19. Recognize the difference between conversational language and academic language and that students need help with both; learning one does not mean you’ve learned the other.
  20. Take the time to learn about English language learners’ home countries. This engenders good will and allows you to make connections in the curriculum.

In addition, in English Language Learners in the Mathematics Classroom, the authors remind us to

  1. Invite ELL students to learn and explore ideas in their own languages first, then translate them to English
  2. Provide ELL students with response stems, such as, “One thing that I learned was … .”
  3. Ask students to restate classmates’ comments as they begin their own comments
  4. Relate concepts in story format before specific instruction.

Stephen Cary, author of Working with English Language Learners: Answers to Teachers’ Top Ten Questions favors authentic talk over compliance talk. “Authentic talk” refers to real conversations about real topics to satisfy real needs, even when this includes the incorporation of local colloquialisms, phrasings, and terms. Consider the value of this dialogue:

Where can I buy soccer cleats? Mine are too old. I can’t turn fast in them. I’m the sweep this weekend.

  1. Wow, I hate playing sweep. I’m a mid-fielder.
  2. I can’t play mid-field very well. It’s too tiring. You have to be everywhere.
  3. Yeah, but you can get the other team off sides.
  4. Sometimes, but I don’t think about that a lot. So, the cleats?
  5. Oh yeah. Over at Fair Oaks Mall, there’s a sports store near the soft pretzel shop.

Students need plenty of experiences with real conversations. 

Something Else to Consider: Some people—educators included— equate low language proficiency with diminished mental function. Because teachers are so accustomed to using verbal and written responses as students’ manifestation of internal thought, they think ELL students are not capable of abstract or sophisticated thinking because their words are not abstract or sophisticated.

As a result, they don’t ask ELL students to make comparisons, analyze data, connect ideas, synthesize concepts, or evaluate performances. By not pushing their ELL students this way, teachers allow these students to fall further behind.Add to this the reality that our society tends to be insensitive to those who do not speak our language well or who do not have our same cultural references.

Many English language learners who are employed in service positions such as custodian, stock clerk, construction worker, and housekeeper have extraordinary depth, complexity, and rich educational backgrounds but are doing these jobs because their lack of language skills prevents them from working in other positions.

One year, I taught a student whose family escaped from brutality in former Romania. The student’s parents had been math professors at prestigious universities in Romania. Here in the United States, however, the student’s father was cleaning offices in the building next to my school and the mother was teaching English at the local library.

Even ELL students who are not from such academically advanced families think in wonderfully imaginative ways, often beyond what can be expressed in English.To not include metaphors and analogies in ELL students’ learning experiences due to language struggles is like assuming they don’t know how to feed themselves because they don’t eat the same food we do. It’s pompous, and it denies ELL students their basic instruction.

We can’t save advanced thinking only for advanced language proficiency students.Freeing Learners to LearnNearing the end of our first full decade in the 21st century, it is no longer acceptable to consider ELL students as someone else’s problem or beyond our instruction. They are just as much a part of the modern teacher’s daily commitment as taking attendance and making sure students have their supplies.We have effective tools for the regular education teacher to help ELL students find every success in our schools. It’s time to free them from what lack of language proficiency would impose.